Recommendation for daily intake of vitamins and minerals

Table 1: Recommended daily intake of various dietary supplements question 6: my plants all lean on the same side, why?

Vitamins Recommended daily intake

Vitamin information pages

Overdose (mg or μg / day)

Biotin
(Group B)

30 μg Biotin in food and as a supplement No information found

Folic acid
(Group B)

400 μg Folic acid in food and as a supplement Doses greater than 400 μg can cause anemia and cover the symptoms of vitamin B deficiency.12 Vitamin A 600 μg Vitamin A in food and as a supplement Extremely high doses (> 9000 mg) can cause fatigue, nausea, loss of appetite, bone and joint pain, skin flaking and headaches.

Vitamin B1 (thiamine)

1.4 mg Vitamin B1 in food and as a supplement No toxic effects have been observed from large doses

Vitamin B2 (riboflavin)

1.6 mg Vitamin B2 in food and as a supplement Doses higher than 200 mg may cause discoloration of the urine

Vitamin B3 (niacin)

18 mg Vitamin B3 in food and as a supplement Doses greater than 150 mg can cause problems ranging from facial redness to liver disease.

Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic acid)

6 mg Vitamin B5 in food and as a supplement The dose should not exceed 1200 mg. This can cause nausea and heartburn

Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine)

2 mg Vitamin B6 in food and as a supplement Doses greater than 100 mg can cause numbness and tingling in the hands and feet

Vitamin B12 (cobalamin)

6 μg Vitamin B12 in food and as a supplement Doses higher than 3000 μg can damage vision

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid)

75 mg Vitamin C in food and as a supplement So far no side effects have been reported

Vitamin D (cholecalciferol)

5 μg Vitamin D in food and as a supplement Large doses (> 50 μg) taken from food can cause eating problems and eventually disorientation, coma and death.

Vitamin E (tocopherol)

10 mg Vitamin E in food and as a supplement Doses greater than 1000 mg cause blood clotting problems, which in turn increase the chance of bleeding in some people. Vitamin K. 80 μg Vitamin K in food and as a supplement Large doses of a form of vitamin K (menadione or K3) may cause liver damage or anemia Minerals Recommended daily intake Overdose Boron <20 mg No information found Calcium 1000 mg Doses greater than 1500 mg can cause stomach problems for sensitive individuals Chlorine 3400 mg No information found Chromium 120 μg Doses higher than 200 μg are toxic and can cause concentration problems and fainting. Copper 2 mg Copper only 10 mg can have toxic effects Fluorine 3.5 mg No information found Iodine 150 μg No information found Iron 15 mg Doses higher than 20 mg can cause constipation, blackheads and stomach upsets Magnesium 350 mg Doses greater than 400 mg can cause stomach problems and diarrhea Manganese 5 mg Too much manganese can affect iron absorption Molybdenum 75 μg Doses higher than 200 μg can cause kidney problems and copper deficiency Nickel <1 mg Nickel-containing products can cause skin rashes in case of allergies Phosphorus 1000 mg Contradiction: FDA (Food and Drug Administration) states that doses above 250 mg can cause stomach problems in sensitive individuals Potassium 3500 mg Large doses can cause stomach upsets, intestinal problems or a broken heart. Selenium 35 μg Doses higher than 200 μg may be toxic Sodium 2400 mg No information found Vanadium <1.8 mg No information found Zinc 15 mg Doses greater than 25 mg can cause anemia and copper deficiency

– The above prices do not represent a diagnosis, they are mainly reference prices for informational purposes.

– Most of these prices are based on 2000 calorie intake for people aged 4 and over. This report applies because it approaches caloric requirements for postmenopausal women. This group has the highest risk of excessive calorie and fat intake.

– Prices are daily reference prices (DRV) of the recommended daily intake (RDI). RDI is a revised price of the old RDA (Recommended nutritional compensation). All values ​​in this table are the new RDI values.

– Maximum values ​​are based on FDA values ​​(Food and Drug Administration), the World Health Organization (WHO), the BBC Health, the European Union’s guidelines (based on FDA prices) and the values ​​of various other private and governmental services in the United States and the United Kingdom.

– The prices of the World Health Organization (WHO) may be slightly lower than the FDA prices for various vitamins and minerals. Examples of differences (WHO values ​​compared to FDA values): Mg: -60 mg; Vitamin B6: -0.5 mg; Vitamin B12: -4 μg; vitamin C: -15 mg; Vitamin K: -35 mg; folic acid: -220 μg.

– Data on daily intake recommended on the μg scale are sometimes referred to as trace elements (eg copper, chromium, selenium).

Recommendation for daily intake of vitamins and minerals
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